Nepal: A land of contrasts

01.11.2017

We bring you some tips from Jean-Christophe who is currently travelling the world with his family

 

“It has been 20 years since I first visited Nepal and my passion for this tiny country has never waned.

Although most of the highest peaks in the world can be found there, it’s not just mountains that I love about Nepal. This small state that measures barely 1,000 km in length and less than 200 km in width is also home to an incredible concentration of ecosystems.”

Nepal has a whole host of distinctive features and some beautiful gems

 

“In Nepal you can go on a safari to catch a glimpse of the Bengal tiger - my recommendation would be the former royal reserve of Bardia, you can take on white water sports, discover the high-altitude deserts of the Upper Mustang, play with the mountain slopes on a mountain bike or experience the country on the handlebars of a mythical Indian Royal Enfield. In spring there’s nothing like walking among the (giant) rhododendrons in full bloom."

 

And of course, there’s the unmissable treks through the heart of the mountains that can last for a few days or several weeks. They are accessible to walkers of all levels of experience, and their main attraction, apart from the spectacular views of the lofty summits, is the chance to meet local people and immerse yourself in Nepalese culture

 

Not forgetting Kathmandu and its valley, which is a UNESCO world heritage site containing many historical and religious places of note.

And a place to stay? 


“Travelling in Nepal is very intense, and the calm of the mountains and distant valleys is all the more welcome when you have spent a few days in the frantic capital. So if I could recommend one place to stay, it would be Namo Buddha Resort for a few days of rest and retreat in the midst of greenery.”

 

Barely an hour east of the capital, perched at the top of a verdant hill, this intimate little lodge is in the form of a Newari village, where each room is a house!

The external architecture is traditional while the interiors are comfortable and cosy. They are an invitation to spend some time resting in contemplation. The lush garden is a model of agritourism, as the eco-lodge is self-sufficient in terms of food and the meals it serves, which are mainly vegetarian, are a real treat!

 

The staff are both thoughtful and discrete, and it is easy to feel at home here.

 

If you feel your desire to explore returning, you can set off on the roads that link the local villages and share a puja at the Namo Buddha Monastery.

 

 

A stay here will leave you truly revitalised, so make the time to spend two or three nights and really appreciate the benefits before setting off again to discover Nepal!

Tip : to see other posts on the same region, click on the name of the country underneath the article title.

 

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